Trigeminal Neuralgia

matthew's picture

I'm sorry I haven't posted much lately. Turns out that, in addition to everything else I get to do, I get the opportunity to be part of a community of people with an affliction known as "Trigeminal Neuralgia".

TNA, as it's sometimes called, is an irritation of the trigeminal nerve. From what my doctor told me today, the nerve leaves your brain and comes close to the skin just below and behind your ear. That soft little dimple just behind your jawbone, feel it? Yeah, that one. Well, anyway, through some poorly understood process, mostly involving positioning of arteries rubbing the myelin sheath of the nerve (although some people point to NICO, where infections cause part of your jawbone to die, as a possible suspect), this nerve becomes inflamed and just goes crazy.

From the perspective of someone who began suffering this type of pain Friday afternoon, it's this excruciating, overpowering pain emanating from around the muscle back by my right-side jawbone hinge, with searing pain flashing through to my upper and lower teeth on the right-hand side and up past my temple and back of my right eyeball. The way I describe the pain is that it feels like someone is cutting my face and jawbone off. The pain is so intense, every time I have an episode, I seriously think I'm going to taste blood inside my mouth.

I'm having one right now as I write. Rhythmic breathing helps me manage the pain, but sometimes it's just so intense I can do nothing but curl up in a ball and whimper in agony.

Well, that's not much fun at all. I plan to write a bit more about this later, but for now, this will have to do.

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JB's picture

Cure for Pain...

The one sure fire cure for pain like that is Percaset (sp)aka "sweet nector of the gods". A narcotic that i have had with a couple of the knee surgeries that i have gone thourgh.. Good stuff, but it will knock you on your butt...Best of luck.. Hope you are out of pain soon....



~Jon~

Timpane's picture

Prognosis?

What does the doctor say about how to deal with this. Is it something that will go away on its own? Can it be fixed with surgery? Is there a way to desensitize this one particular Myelin Sheath without causing secondary paralysis?

Meantime, what are you diong for pain. If theis is short term, Percocet or Morphine or Tylenol 3 can be very helpful.

Long term, does an antiinflammatory like Aspirin relieve pressure on the nerve? I.E. what is the next step?

NVZ: NINJAS VS ZOMBIES - THE MOVIE - www.nvzmovie.com
THE OFFICIAL JUSTIN TIMPANE WEBSITE - www.timpane.com

matthew's picture

Regular medications...

Unfortunately, most narcotics are absolutlely useless for this type of nerve pain. A horrifically overdosed coctail of Motrin, Midol, Tylenol, and aspirin did zero to relieve the pain or intensity of the attacks.

The only drugs that have any effect on the pain are anticonvulsives. They don't moderate the pain, actually, but they moderate the severity of the attacks. The same drugs in epileptics tend to have similar effects: they stop the seizures entirely, or mitigate their effects so they are not as severe. I began taking "Neurontin", a relatively new anticonvulsive, yesterday. It has slowed them down from every 30-40 minutes to only after I eat.

That's the part that's really, really weird. I can chew gum: no effect. Drink cold water: no effect. But the moment I eat anything moderately sugary or starchy, within 10 minutes I have another attack. I'm not positive there's a causal relationship there, but the correlation is nearly too strong to ignore.

On the plus side, I've lost six pounds in five days largely due to my inability to eat without pain. I'm forcing myself to just eat as fast as I can today, so that I'm finished before the attack hits; I generally have 3-6 minutes before it comes on.

Cold and hot packs seem to mitigate the pain somewhat, and keep me from being completely incoherent. Without them, the pain's so bad my whole body like freaks out: I'm left trembling, hardly able to stand, not entirely in control of my muscles. A part of my brain realizes this is simply a reaction to the adrenaline surging through my system, but when the pain is so bad that I can't think of anything else, it's really hard to be rational and avoid hitting things.

Anyway, there are surgical procedures to remedy this, but they are only about 50-70% effective. Drugs tend to be more effective, and thankfully the malady is supposed to come and go, so that I don't have to be on drugs all the time -- just when it's active. I'll be on this drug for about 2-3 months, varying the dosage until we've reached a point where it completely prevents attacks. If it doesn't, then we'll get to experiment with other drugs.

You know, I've never been really "high" before, and I guess that's one plus of this drug: I'm kind of sleepy, and I feel like I see everything in 2-D, plus my head is light and I feel very pleasant and relaxed. Mmm, legal high.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

cheese?

I don't suffer from this often - maybe a one or two day attack every two months. I have noticed that if I'm stuffed up the attacks are more frequent. So, I tested myself by eliminating mucous forming foods. Cheese and bread mostly. This made a big difference (thou it's depressing cuz I LOVE cheese) although I can't prove that TN is related to food allergies. I wouldn't be the least bit surprised tho.

I also have migraines occassionally, but I've never had one at the same time as TN. For me anyway, they are not related.

I'm also into Dr. Johanna Budwig and her flaxseed cure for every known ailment. Do a net search on her name.

matthew's picture

Strong suspicion...

I've had a strong suspicion my TNA attacks are diet-related. Since I started the Atkins diet, I haven't had anything but the very slightest of twinges, whereas before I was getting a fairly hefty, but not excruciating, attack every 2-3 days, even after my root canal. Admittedly, they were not as severe as when I had the infected tooth, but they were still pretty uncomfortable.

Obviously, this isn't scientific in the least, but I noticed that when I had the rotten tooth, it was after I'd eaten that the worst attacks would come. I lost several pounds because I avoided eating due to the pain. However, I could be certain that sugary or starchy foods would invariably create much worse attacks. Kind of curious, that.

Although I don't suspect a specific food allergy, starchy foods may be a kind of trigger for me. I don't think cheese is. Every person's biochemistry is different, though, so I'm certain cheese could very well be a trigger for you! That's definitely one thing I've learned from frequenting so many Atkins diet bulletin boards and newsgroups. Every person's body seems to respond differently to different chemicals; it's pretty amazing what different experiences we all have.

And yet, people seem to think that because a particular thing worked for them, it must work for everybody else. I think that's a major source of confusion in the medical community and amongst laypeople, like me, who are interested in medicine.

I'll have to check out Dr. Budwig's stuff. I'm planning on picking up some flaxseed meal to sprinkle in my salads here within a couple weeks, just to help make sure everything "keeps moving" if you know what I mean ;)

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Matthew P. Barnson

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Matthew P. Barnson

I have recently heard about t

I have recently heard about this disiese, because I have the symptom of electrical shocks in through my hands and on out my fingers. I also, have the same kind of shocks come through my upper and lower lips, and throug the jaw bone. The neuroligist that I saw said that it was stress. I had an MRI and he told me that he saw nothing wrong and that it was just stress that was causing these strange sensations. I am just glad that my pain is not as severe as yours. Good luck. Terri

matthew's picture

Stress???

When a doctor says that trigeminal neuralgia is due to stress, it sure sounds like saying death is due to heart failure. Ultimately, your heart will fail -- but it may not be the cause of the problem.

I'm no physician, but allow me to suggest seeing a different one. You may also want to visit the Trigeminal Neuralgia Support Site to determine if that's what you have or not. Your self-diagnosis and treatment plan will be better than what any doctor can come up with for you if you educate yourself.

Unfortunately, the only way to confirm if it is TNA is to go through the prescriptions. I took Neurontin to resolve mine, and it works very well at mitigating attacks when they do happen, plus preventing attacks in the first place. For some people, other factors are "triggers" for attacks, including stress, infection, and other injury. In my case, a dead nerve in a tooth triggered severe attacks. Since I had a root canal, they are much less severe -- but the trigeminal hyperactivity is still there, and occasionally hurts like the blazes.

Get a second opinion. You have a right to live life free from pain.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

Timpane's picture

Pain and Self Diagnosis

As a barnsonian, I fear to ever disagree with the master..

But as someone in the field and training to be in the field as a career, I must agree on one point, and disagree on another.

Pain free - yes, you do have a right to that.. and yes, do get a second and even a third opinion. Always, that is a good idea.

Educate yourself - yes! Ultimately, you DO need to be in charge of your own care, and I recommend WebMD as well.

Self Diagnosis and treatment: NO!!! Bad idea. Let your diagnosis come from a Dr., and work with him/her once you are satisfied with the diagnosis to come up with a treatment plan that helps you. be sure to communicate EVERYTHING you do to treat the problem as well as what you have tried. Some tratments counteract each other, and some can cause problems when used in conjunction with others.

Good luck!

NVZ: NINJAS VS ZOMBIES - THE MOVIE - www.nvzmovie.com
THE OFFICIAL JUSTIN TIMPANE WEBSITE - www.timpane.com

matthew's picture

Right...

What I meant to say was that your educated self-diagnosis, accompanied by a doctor-supervised treatment plan, will be better than what any doctor prescribes without your educated involvement.

Regularly self-medicating leads to disasters of Limbaughian proportions. However, adjusting one's own prescriptions, based on doctor recommendations and self-education on proper doses, side-effects, and interactions, is vital to controlling certain conditions. In my case, with Neurontin, the doctor informed me what a safe dose was, said we'd be adjusting it through repeat visits, and allowed me to adjust the level of my medication to match the requirements of my condition. I confirmed his opinion through medical journals and studies of the medication.

You know your symptoms better than anybody else. If you find something that fits the facts, try to find more options that also fit the facts, and discuss them with a doctor. For instance, I've been suffering some pain over the last year in the groin area, up front, where the major tendon is that raises my right leg. I thought it was perhaps a hernia. I mentioned this to my doctor; he checked for that, said "well, it could be possible, except you don't have any muscles to herniate right there, only tendons and ligaments", then advised me to simply take it easy on that joint area for a while and do different exercises than the ones that cause me pain (no more bicycle ab workouts for me, dang!).

The most important thing about any treatment plan, from where I sit, is to try to educate yourself enough about any potential condition so that you know more than your doctor. It's your condition -- not his. I'm not suggesting that Justin implied we should turn over all responsibility for health conditions to professionals, but there are many who look at a doctor as the "magic man" to fix their ills. There are enough cases of mis-diagnosis that it's incredibly valuable to get a second opinion, even if that opinion comes from a doctor you trust where the problem area isn't his specialty. You never know what types of cases a doctor's treated in his history.

I guess what I'm saying is, if you learn everything you can about the health conditions of yourself or a loved one, you are in an empowered position to take steps to remedy it. Doctors disagree on many, many things, and if you understand all sides of an argument on something controversial (like Trigeminal Neuralgia, which does not show up in MRI and diagnosis is purely based on symptoms), you can come to an educated decision regarding your treatment plan -- even to refuse it, if necessary. If you just leave all such decisions up to a doctor, you've ceded your personal responsibility to an authority figure. And that's a disaster waiting to happen.

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Matthew P. Barnson

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Matthew P. Barnson

Neurontin and Diet for Trigeminal Neuragia

I'm 6"-4" tall and weigh 240 pounds and have been on Neurontin for TN for five weeks now. After adusting the dosage a couple of times, I've settled on one 300mg tablet, twice a day (7:00 A.M. & 7:00 P.M.) and have eliminated TN pain episodes altogether! The only side affect I have is that I take naps now as I sometimes get a little drowsy on this dosage. However, after a few minute nap, I'm ready to go again.

In my case, diet has not caused pain episodes (I do however think stress has played a part in the onset of my TN) but I can feel something in the nerve when I do eat sweets and carbs. I too am going to start the Atkins Diet as I have been on a low-fat diet for about ten years and have read and discussed with doctors the fact that the insulator around the trigeminal nerve (and other nerves) is comprised mainly of fat. In addition, a recent test on children with epilepsy found that the children on the Atkins Diet stopped having seizures altogether. It's worth a shot.

Jim C.

Vicky

I have had trigeminal neuralgia for over 5 years. I have been taking tegretol. Recently the pain began again. I was having a hard time talking and eating. At one point I could do nothing more than use a straw. I feared going out in the cold. I am currently taking both tegretol and Neurontin at their highest level. The doctor has said that drug therapy may no longer work for me. I saw your comment about atkins. As a result, I have started the Atkins diet at 45 g of carbs. My pain is reducing. I'm not yet sure that it is a result of the reduction in carbohydrates. I have just lowered the carbs to 20 g.

Although I don't yet know if the Atkins diet will do the trick, I appreciate you posting your experience.

Thanks, Vicky

matthew's picture

Atkins

Realize, the whole Atkins thing reducing my pain may be a complete, absolute red herring! It may have nothing at all to do with it. Basically, though, I knew that it hurt worst immediately after I ate, so I started losing weight from avoiding eating due to the pain. Then I started on Atkins almost exactly a month after my attacks began, and the weight loss continued while the pain reduced.

For those of us who suffer from TNA, often a rotten tooth or other jaw injury can trigger the attacks as well (see "[The Root Canal]"). My TNA continued for about two weeks into me eating low-carb, but the already-low pain levels and frequency post-Root-Canal dropped from about one moderate attack per day to about one or two slight attacks per week. I think the root canal definitely helped, and the rotten tooth was probably the initial trigger for my TNA. I no longer take medication to manage my condition; although I do have TNA flashes about once or twice a week, some pain management techniques I learned from Lamaze years ago are enough to deal with them.

My mother-in-law has had similar problems with massive head pain over the last several years. She recently had all of her old mercury/silver fillings replaced with the new, enamel-like stuff. Her pain disappeared, and the diet remedies she'd relied on for years to avoid the pain (no corn, no flour, no nitrates, etc.) were no longer necessary. So, as always, your mileage may vary. TNA also can be an incredibly complex condition, particularly if your pain is not the simple, straightforward type like mine was. If your pain extends to the neck or further back, or varies from "typical" "back-of-jaw to temple" pain, then you may be in for a rougher time.

Best of luck to you. Be sure to have your doctor and dentist give their recommendations. I'm a huge fan of the Atkins Nutritional Approach now since I've lost nearly thirty pounds without any hunger, and have experienced massively more energy and vitality in my daily life versus the nearly-vegetarian regime I was following before. The loss of TNA symptoms and most of my Irritable Bowel Syndrome were just excellent side effects that may be coincidence :)

Also, if you have a spare 10 minutes, check out this guy's experience with TNA. He doesn't suffer any longer from the pain at all, and has some pictures of the scar & staples from the operation that saved him from the pain. The operation isn't for everyone, but if you are in severe, constant pain from your TNA, or the medication interferes with your mobility or memory, it may be for you.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

matthew's picture

Sister-in-law

My sister-in-law is epileptic, and in her teenage years a combination of "ketogenic diet" (quite extreme, actually, with almost zero carbs and very strict calorie control, not the moderate "lots of vegetables while losing weight" low-carbing Dr. Atkins recommends) and drugs reduced her seizures quite a bit, from what I understand. Unfortunately, it was very tough to maintain since it was such a strict diet. However, there's a definite correlation.

I'd love it if Mr. Anonymous posted again to let me know what the results are of his Atkins experiment. If many of us find that a fat and protein-rich diet moderate our symptoms, we may really be onto something here, which a study could back up.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

Trigenial neuralgia

Hi
I had trigenial neuralgia from 1994, was put on Tegretonal in 2000, after a few root canaljobs. Pain stopped , floated like a cloud, not good for work . Went to a accupuntuirist , he gave me the pressure points to press to block the nerve, right side cheek and eye. It has worked, I can stop the pain as soon as it starts. I have a picture of the pressure points if any one wants it.
Now have been diagonosed with MS, doc says this is part of the same nerve sheath deterioration, I am looking for food /diet that will rebuild the nerve sheaths.I would appreciate any one who has a direction.
Thanks
Roy

matthew's picture

That is AWESOME, Vicky!

Vicky, I am impressed and amazed at the correlation there. Please keep us informed on this page as your condition progresses to let me know how it continues to affect your health!

You may want to register for an account here at barnson.org; doing so allows you to send private messages via the web site (keeping your email address confidential), and a few other benefits like being able to post comments without me having to approve them first :)

Anyway, hearing that this seems to be having such a positive effect on your condition really makes me wonder. I know for many, TNA is a condition that has very specific physical causes (nerve wrapped around an artery is one), but if somehow eating a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet prevents flare-ups, that's just awesome. Some doctors have told me that TNA can also often be alleviated somewhat by losing weight, so that may be an additional help.

Keep us posted! And if you do register, email me a digital picture (doesn't have to be one of you, it can be one of your dog, your cat, or a movie character or whatever) to matthew@barnson.org so that I can make a little avatar for you for when you post. I may make a front-page blog entry about the possible connection between Atkins eating plans and TNA relief here at some point.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

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Matthew P. Barnson

Yes please post the pressure

Yes please post the pressure points.
Thanks!

Here's another avenue to think about or experiment with.

Having bought a laptop computer turned me into more of a couch potato than is healthy. Ever have those experiences where you've been sitting too long in one position watching tv or surfing or whatever and your body starts to 'tweak' at you here and there, as if to say "get off yer butt!"? This made me think that such lethargy may trigger the TN. I tried an experiment where I did these yoga stretch and hold positions to stretch out my spine. I didn't have a TN attack for that entire time which was about two months. When I stopped, they eventually came back. Hmmmmm....

Trigenial Neuralgia

My Mother seems to have this complaint and it gets her down very badly. It seems worse in times of stress. Do you know if there is any cure for it?

Regards

Jan

matthew's picture

Cure...

Unfortunately, the only known permanent cure involves surgery, where they unwrap the artery from around the nerve, and sheathe the nerve with Teflon.

However, sometimes people find relief in replacing old dental work, taking anti-convulsive drugs such as Neurontin or Tegratol, or in pain medication. Unfortunately, acetomenophin, aspirin, and ibuprofin do little to nothing for the pain, which is not a type of pain that an anti-inflammatory like those drugs can manage. I found relief in Lortab on my bad days.

You should visit The Trigeminal Neuralgia Support Site for more information.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

Timpane's picture

Acetominophen

Is an antipyretic

I am SUCH a loser.

NVZ: NINJAS VS ZOMBIES - THE MOVIE - www.nvzmovie.com
THE OFFICIAL JUSTIN TIMPANE WEBSITE - www.timpane.com

diet

I've noticed something else. For years I've been into visualization therapy (successfully: see the Simonton book "Getting Well") for various physical complaints and I started to think about what TN might look like from the inside out.

I have anatomy books that help me visualize areas. During a meditation it "came to me" that over time a build up of allergy-related mucous that, for whatever reason, gets trapped in the body and cannot find its way out in a normal fashion may lodge near the trigeminal nerve and increase pressure on it causing an attack. With that anecdotal idea in mind, I decided to pop a preventative antihistamine/decongestent daily in an attempt to thwart such a possible build-up.

I don't like popping pills (especially those with yellow 5) so I don't take the sleepy 12-hour versions. I take one 6-hr before I head for work in the morning and another 6 hour around supper time, my hope being that mucous forming foods, or airborne allergy triggers will not be permitted to create mucous. Whether it really works, or is just a matter of belief...I don't care. I haven't had an attack since I started this, and am presuming that (excuse the expression) "less snot in my head" is less pressure on the nerve. I will report back if I get another attack.

PS: I have noticed during nose-blowing that my left side (where my attacks occur) 'crackles' in a way my right side does not giving me the sense that there is some structural difference on that side. In the next few months I intend to see an Eye,Ear,Nose,Throat doc to determine if there is some structural malady that may be causing problems. I'll report about that too.

EDIT by matthew: Linked, fixed formatting problem.

TN & YOGA

HI CAN YOU TELL ME WHICH YOGA POSES THEY WERE I TOO HAVE TN AND PRACTICE YOGA AND WOULD LOVE TO KNOW THIS
CARLA

matthew's picture

Bunk

Unfortunately, I think attempting to use yoga to cure physical diseases is hogwash at best, and can be harmful due to neglect of conventional treatments at worst.

It works to improve your stamina, though. And yoga definitely increases your threshold of tolerating pain, which may be useful.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

pressure points

I would like to see a copy of the pressure points. My father is suffering greatly from the pain.

Thank you for this site.

Thank you for this site.
I would like to suggest a few links for you http://neurosurgery.mgh.harvard.edu/guest/tn-hfs/guest.htm)
http://www.mytn.co.uk/
In addition I would like to let you know about my book, A Pained Life, a chronic pain journey. It is the first first-person account of the daily living with and struggle against trigeminal neuralgia.
An excerpt can be found at: http://www2.xlibris.com/bookstore/book_excerpt.asp?bookid=18435
and the book at:
http://www2.xlibris.com/bookstore/bookdisplay.asp?bookid=18435
Thank you and I wish you well in your struggle against this pain.

forgot to add this support geoup link

Yahoo groups has an excellent support group for patients and friends, families, etc who want to help/support them.

http://groups.yahoo.com/search?query=trigeminal+neuralgia
Thank you

diet, allergy and mucous

Having just found this site after a quick search I have found all the comments very helpful and interesting. Particularly those to do with diet and allergy.
My pain started just over a week ago whilst on a stressful family reunion in the UK (I live in France). It presents as excruciating pain in my left temple, sinuses, behind my ear and down my neck. This happens everytime I look left or up or indeed touch my closed left eye or move it(this is problematic as I have ocular rosacea and have to administer cortisone eyedrops three times daily - I keep missing as I jerk when I move my eye!).
I friend suggested TN as she had the exact same symptoms some years back.
When it initially started I suspected stress and allergy. I had recently completed a course of antibiotics for laryngitis and a chesty cough, which had not disappeared and I was still very mucousy. On top of that the rapeseed was in full flower which made me suspect allergy. This seems to tie in with your conclusions. However I am back in France now and there is no abatement of symptoms so it is time to be a bit proactive.

I think I might try antihistamines for awhile but am definitely going to go for the diet option. Sometime ago I was on the 'Fat Flush' diet which worked very well for me. It is low carb with some additions like daily flaxoil and works towards healthy liver function and insulin balance. Since coming of it two years ago I have got very overweight so maybe that is a factor. I was also told by a homeopath to stay of wheat.
There seems to be alot of coincidences here. I look forward to following the forum.

matthew's picture

Slow going :)

Well, since I published this in September of 2003, with just the number of comments you see since then, you can tell it's slow going :)

For actual real support and suggestions for dealing with TNA, try tna-support.org.

Because TNA is actually so rare in the general population, there don't appear to be any support forums (that I could find in a few minutes of Googling) specifically for TNA. However, there are some chronic pain forums that, if you're looking for a discussion of TNA, may be relevant:
http://www.healingwell.com/community/default.aspx?f=16
http://www.painworld.zip.com.au/cgi-bin/pain.cgi

And here's a big page to a boatload of various information on chronic pain:
http://www.chronicpaincanada.org/nacpac09.htm

--
Matthew P. Barnson

--
Matthew P. Barnson

Picture of pressure points

Please email a copy of the pressure points picture.

TN

Hi Matthew... Great explanation couldn't have done better myself. I've had pain since sept '04, officially diagnosed in Oct '04 and we are now May '05. My neurologist has me on 200mg of tegretol 3x's a day along w/ 300mg gabapentin 3x's a day and assures me not to worry he's sure it will go away on its own and that I'm not on the maximum dosage so not to worry.

I'm fed up w/ meds I still have pain and when the weathers bad the pain is worse.. i can almost tell you when its gonna rain...I dont have a government job that gives ya medical leave its retail..i also dont have medical insurance...but i can claim some of my expenses on income tax.

I find that since taking the meds I've become the worst procrastinator..Some night i have shallow breathing... not sure its a side effect.. but I'll play it out..I was thinking of trying accupuncture but i dont want to umm .. how do i say this.. I dont want my Dr. to think i dont trust his judgement but heck i need some relief soon..I guess i'm affraid of insulting is judgement.. know what i mean..anyhow i still have pain and i'm just playing a waiting game :(

TN

I know that this was an old message, however, if you still have available the picture of the pressure points can you send them to me?
Would appreciate it much!

Thanxs

Trigeminal Neuralgia.

Hi, Roy

I read your article when searching for Trigeminal Neuralgia. Is it possible for you to e-mail me the picture of the pressure points you talked about? I will really appreciate it if you can..

Thank you,

Roberto

percocet

Unfortunately, percocet does not have any effect on TN - there are NO pain killers that help this - I suffer with TN and the only thing that helps are anticonvulsants - I am on trileptal.

matthew's picture

Lortab

Lortab dramatically reduces the pain of my TN attacks. You should try that, if the anticonvulsants aren't enough.

I'm not knocking the AC's -- I've used Neurontin, myself -- but those are aimed at stopping the attack from happening, not at mitigating the pain of the attack when it happens. I've noticed that when I'm on my Neurontin that they are not so strong, but Lortab is a decent fix for the extreme pain. However, since the condition is generally chronic and incurable, you can't just take Lortab 24/7...

--
Matthew P. Barnson

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Matthew P. Barnson

TN pressure points

This is a reply to a message of yours dated 01/22/2004 and hope you still are offering the info on the presure points to block TN pain.

Thanks in advance,

Allen

pressure points

Did you get a copy of the pressure points that you requested. If you did, can you email me a copy? My daugther suffers from TN and I am looking for anything that may help her.

matthew's picture

Closing...

I'm closing this thread to new comments, as it's become nothing but a string of "where are the pressure points?" "will you email me the pressure points?" "what pressure points?" etc. ad nauseum.

I recommend TNA-Support rather than my blog if you are looking for Trigeminal Neuralgia support. Their forums are a veritable fountain of information for sufferers.

--
Matthew P. Barnson

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Matthew P. Barnson